Book Marketing

Publicity and Reviews

Questions to Ask Your Publicist

Whether you are publishing with a traditional house, an independent publisher, or self-publishing, the bulk of book marketing responsibility is on you as the author. This may include everything from building an author website to crafting new original content, and it will almost certainly include building a strong social media presence. There are many aspects of book marketing that authors can and should take on themselves.

When it comes to publicity, however, it's often a good idea to call in reinforcements. 

Securing Endorsements

While technological advances has made publishing a book easier, it also means that selling a book is harder. Increased competition means that it is more important than ever to make sure that your book stands out to both the bookstores who may consider stocking it on their shelves and consumers looking for their next read.

How to Handle a Bad Book Review

Face it. Bad book reviews happen. Even the most acclaimed writers get bad reviews, whether it's from the New York Times Book Review or an anonymous reviewer on Amazon. Evaluating a book is a subjective process, and personal preferences won’t always match the book. 

Unfortunately, too many writers take bad reviews personally and even go to the extremes, engaging in negative banter, slander, and threats. When it comes to negative reviews, there are ways to work through them and even see them as an asset to your writing. Here are a few tips to help you take those bad reviews with grace.